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How Books are Made ~ a Summary

Posted By TSRT Communication and Web Coordinator, Thursday, November 6, 2008
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

[Guest writer: Sheryl Williams]

How Books are Made
Presented by Dr. Sheila Siegler, Paper Conservator and Conservation Scientist, and Sarah Ogren, Houchen Bindery, Ltd.
-Sheryl Williams

Sheila described the use of scrolls (first printed on papyrus which had been woven and then beaten flat), and how exciting it was when a “book” with folded papers (“leaves”) was developed, because then writing could occur on both sides of the paper. The printing press came into existence; scrolls were rolled, but books were sewn. This early hand-sewing was very strong, and the paper, until the Industrial Revolution, was also very strong. When cheaper methods of producing paper were sought, developers turned to pulverizing wood and adding acid to breaking down the wood fibers. This acid remains in the paper, and is still breaking down the fibers. That’s why old paper becomes brittle and falls apart.

Binding became quite developed with the invention of the sewing machine. Volumes remained strong, although if a page was ripped out, it was necessary to re-sew the whole volume, more binding edge would be needed. Glue was applied to the outside of the spine to allow the application of a reinforcing strip under the cover. Glue continued to be developed, and the heat-set glue of a “perfect” binding came into existence. It was hardly perfect. You’ll find it in paperbacks that crack apart when opened, and the pages fall out.

Leather bindings look nice, but don’t last as long as you would think. Today’s buckram products are longer-lasting, glue has developed through chemistry, and the double-fan adhesive method of binding, now the practice endorsed by the Library Binding Institute, holds as well as sewing.

Why do the fronts of Victorian family Bibles always come off? Because they were bound without the hinging support necessary to allow frequent opening. And only the front cover fell off, because they weren’t opened from the back.

Tags:  conference  conference & meeting reports  news  updates 

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Dewey or Don’t We ~ a Summary

Posted By TSRT Communication and Web Coordinator, Thursday, November 6, 2008
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

[Guest writer: Sheryl Williams]

Dewey or Don’t We?
Presented by Becky Baker, Seward Memorial Library; Kim McCain, Tri-county Schools; and Hilary Sire, Barnes & Noble

This panel presentation concerned the planning involved and implementation of the change from a Dewey-organization to a subject-based organization in the Seward Memorial Library. This was a well-attended panel, with almost 100 people attending.

The process of reassigning a shelf location involved all staff; everyone contributed to the development of the subject areas. An “authority file” of main subject headings was determined, such as:
Language
Inspirational
New Age
Unexplained
Trivia
Humor
Literature
Sports, etc

These areas were sub-divided, then the author listed, and finally the first word of the title.
For Tom Osborne’s book, What it means to be a Husker, the spine label now reads
Sports
Football
Husker
Osborne
What

The primary consideration before this is undertaken is to determine if users were browsing or research oriented. Also, what are the capabilities of the automated system? Shelves must be clearly marked with the subjects displayed.

This is working well for the Seward Memorial Library.

“Librarians like to think that we're indispensable. While I think that is true to a point, I don't think we should continue to propagate the idea that we're indispensable by keeping a complicated cataloging system.” -- Michael Casey

Tags:  conference  conference & meeting reports  news  updates 

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Pre-Conference 2008: What is a Book Worth? Determining the Value of a Book

Posted By TSRT Communication and Web Coordinator, Monday, October 20, 2008
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

[Guest writer: unidentified]

I could be considered prejudiced, but this was a very informative session. Dr. Sidney Berger, director of the library at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, MA, describes himself as a “lunatic collector.” Or maybe that was his wife describing him.

It’s no easy task assigning a value to a book. There isn’t a checklist of items to look for with any book in a box of donations, or on your shelves. There are two primary criteria for determining value: supply and demand, and condition. Age has practically no bearing on the value. A first edition is not necessarily a valuable item, and there is the question of printing run, impression, and state. Condition can range from pristine to fine plus, fine, fine minus, good plus, good, good minus, reading copy (no longer a collector’s copy), poor copy of a scarce book, etc. . . . . Seriously, these are all accepted levels of condition.

Other considerations include author, illustrator, publisher, binder, binding, provenance, and other features. You really have to know what you have, or at least where to find out what you have.

There are paper-based guides to determining a value, but their limitation is lack of currency. The Web abounds with information; some search terms are, book appraisal, book collecting, collecting [subject], book price guides, bookselling. Sample sites are Alibris (now merged with Interloc and Bibliocity), Amazon, Bookfinder (formerly MX Bookfinder), ABEBooks (Advanced Book Exchange), AddAll, and Bibliofind. You have to identify which version/printing/publisher/issue/state/date/points (those identifiers which make your volume different) are applicable to your copy and/or the one on the web. Check out the entries on ABEBooks for Golden Child, http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&tn=golden+child&x=0&y=0 Notice the name of the bookseller and the bookseller’s rating. The description may include a commercial for the seller.

Booksellers set their own prices, and they can vary widely. Many vary without any reason. You’ll need to know the pricing history. As with any merchandise, a book is worth what someone is willing to pay for it. Appraisers will set a higher price than a book buyer will pay; expect a bookseller to offer 40%-50% of the appraised value.

That family Bible you have? It has no value outside of your family. The Bible is the most frequently reprinted volume. Even that family history doesn’t make it special.

We had intended to cap enrollment at 40, but we squeezed in 43. In the evaluation, those responding were overwhelmingly satisified with the presentation, although many commented that Dr. Berger skipped around in his outline. There were several requests to have him return for another presentation.

Tags:  conference  conference & meeting reports  tsrt  updates 

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TSRT Silent Auction Item Is Quite A Hit!

Posted By TSRT Communication and Web Coordinator, Monday, October 20, 2008
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

[Guest writer: Sheryl Williams]

This year's Silent Auction was to have a "Nebraska" theme. After a lot of discussion, your Board decided to put together an "Outdoor Nebraska" offering, featuring a 2009 Nebraska Game & Parks Commission State Park Permit. We also added in a few donated books on scenic Nebraska, plus a cookbook compiled from NebraskaLand issues. A relatively inexpensive basket, as the park permit is only $20. The list of bidders started out strong; we immediately had a list longer than the other auction items. Final bid was $35, which was pretty much what everything else went for, from the Kool-Aid basket to the whole pork loin to the tin painting.

Tags:  conference  news  silent auction  tsrt  updates 

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Judy Johnson Retires

Posted By TSRT Communication and Web Coordinator, Friday, October 3, 2008
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

[Guest writer: Sheryl Williams]

The time has come to say farewell to another long-time TSRT member. Judy has been with UNL for a number of years, most recently as Coordinator, Acquisitions and Electronic Licensing.

We all wish Judy the best that retirement can offer.

Tags:  news  retirements  tsrt  updates 

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Registration Full – “What is a book worth?”

Posted By TSRT Communication and Web Coordinator, Thursday, October 2, 2008
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015
Registration for our fall pre-conference "What is a book worth?: determining the value of a book" closed on September 19th and we are happy to say that we hit our goal of 40 participants. In fact, we are a little over so we apologize but cannot take any more registrations. The board really appreciates the enthusiasm for this program and look forward to reading your evaluations. If things go well, we may consider it again in the future for a spring meeting or another pre-conference. We could not do this without your help and, in addition, we would like to recognize grant assistance made possible by McGoogen Library-UNMC, Mountain Plains Library Association, University of Nebraska Press, and Houchen Bindery.

Tags:  conference  news  registration  updates 

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Library Camp Nebraska

Posted By TSRT Communication and Web Coordinator, Monday, September 29, 2008
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015
Library Camp Nebraska
University of Nebraska-Lincoln Wednesday 19 November 2008
Sponsored by The Nebraska Library Commission and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries

Library Camp Nebraska is the first of what we hope to be a series of unconferences throughout the state of Nebraska. So, just what is an unconference?

An unconference is the best part of a conference (conversing with your colleagues) stripped out and crammed into a fun and informative day-long event. Unconferences have no pre-selected presenters, just group discussions on the topics that you want to talk about with your colleagues. There are many different ways unconferences can be run. Library Camp Nebraska will be using the BarCamp model this time around.

Library Camp Nebraska will be held at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln Union on 19 November 2008. Participation will be limited to just the first 100 registrants and is open to anyone who is interested in dialogue and conversation about customer-friendly libraries, library 2.0 and how we can all improve our services and organizations to meet the needs of our communities. (There will be tech topics covered, but if you aren't a techie, come talk about something else.)

For more details and to register head over to the Library Camp Nebraska wiki at (link removed). Please don’t wait until the last minute to register. Seating will be strictly limited to the first 100 registrants. No additional seats will be made available.

(Please feel free to forward to everyone.)

Tags:  conference  library camp  news  training  update 

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TSRT Pre-Conference

Posted By TSRT Communication and Web Coordinator, Monday, September 29, 2008
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

[Guest writer: Sheryl Williams]

I'm so impressed with the turn-out for our first-ever TSRT-sponsored pre-conference. Registrations kept arriving, and we had to stick to our cut-off date of Sept. 19. We have 44 registered for the day. We picked a great topic for this event; the number who responded indicates a need for it.

And the TSRT-sponsored sessions during conference also sound great. I hope all of you will get to attend them.

See you at Conference!

Tags:  conference  news  registration  tsrt  updates 

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Curious about “What a Book is Worth?”

Posted By TSRT Communication and Web Coordinator, Wednesday, August 20, 2008
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015
Sign up today to attend the pre-conference on Dr. Berger's presentation of "Determining the Value of a Book." There are still about 20 spaces left. First come, first serve!

Tags:  conference  news  tsrt  update 

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2008 Annual Conference and Pre-Conference Information Posted

Posted By TSRT Communication and Web Coordinator, Monday, July 14, 2008
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015
TSRT will sponsor five great programs for the 2008 Annual Conference and one all-day Pre-Conference. For more information, proceed to our page on the annual conference. As always, look for some wonderful reviews post-conference. Better yet, sign up now to be a reviewer.

Tags:  conference  news  tsrt 

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